NO2/N2O4 Equilibrium Computer Simulation

2NO2 <=> N2ODynamic Equilibrium New Blender Computer Animation

First draft by Jared Brandon, University of Oregon, May, 2018

 https://youtu.be/aOuqVrp7zkc

This animation pairs well with the 2NO2 <=> N2O4 equilibrium demonstration

Curriculum Notes 

AP Chem Learning Objectives

LO 6.1 The student is able to, given a set of experimental observations regarding physical, chemical biological, or environmental processes that are reversible, construct an explanation that connects the observations to the reversibility of the underlying chemical reactions or processes. 

LO 6.2 The student can, given a manipulation of a chemical reaction or set of reactions (e.g. reversal of reaction or addition of two reactions), determine the effects of that manipulation on Q or K. (

LO 6.3 The student can connect kinetics to equilibrium by using reasoning about equilibrium, such as Le Châtelier’s Principle, to infer the relative rates of the forward and reverse reactions. (Sec 13.7)

LO 6.4 The student can, given a set of initial conditions (concentrations or partial pressures) and the equilibrium constant, K, use the tendency of Q to approach K to predict and justify the prediction as to whether the reaction will proceed toward products or reactants as equilibrium is approached.

LO 6.5 The student can, given data (tabular, graphical, etc.) from which the state of a system at equilibrium can be obtained, calculate the equilibrium constant, K. 

LO 6.6 The student can, given a set of initial conditions (concentrations or partial pressures) and the equilibrium constant, K, use stoichiometric relationships and the law of mass action (Q equals K at equilibrium) to determine qualitatively and/or quantitatively the conditions at equilibrium for a system involving a single reversible reaction.

LO 6.7 The student is able, for a reversible reaction that has a large or small K to determine which chemical species will have very large versus very small concentrations at equilibrium. (

LO 6.8 The student is able to use Le Châtelier’s Principle to predict the direction of the shift resulting from various possible stresses on a system at chemical equilibrium.

LO 6.9 The student is able to use Le Châtelier’s Principle to design a set of conditions that will optimize a desired outcome, such as product yield. 

LO 6.10 The student is able to connect Le Châtelier’s Principle to the comparison of Q to K by explaining the effects of the stress on Q and K. 

© Copyright 2012 Email: Randy Sullivan, University of Oregon Chemistry Department and UO Libraries Interactive Media Group